This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Chris 4 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #2227

    Chris
    Keymaster

    I found this article shared on Facebook. I call it the grand daddy of conspiracy theories.  It blames everything bad up to and including the sinking of the Titanic and WWI on every evil doer from the Rothchilds to the Catholic church and the Jesuits. Whether true in whole, in part, or not at all it’s a fun read. Nice pictures too.

  • #2232

    ◄Dave►
    Participant

    That was an enjoyable diversion, Chris. I didn’t find the conspiracy stuff very compelling; but the pictures and the documentary were fascinating. Thanks for sharing. ◄Dave►

  • #2234

    Chris
    Keymaster

    Exactly Dave. It was fun to read. Now I can indeed think of cheaper and easier ways to deal with a few money titans than building the worlds biggest ocean liner then sinking it. Good thing that captain was able to find just the right iceberg that could sink an “unsinkable” boat. That’s just me though. I don’t have that sort of diabolical mind. Sort of like they really didn’t have to collapse the twin towers as a false flag. Something much less “spectacular” would have done fine if they wanted to piss Americans off.

  • #2415

    Larry
    Participant

    I’ll try to read it shortly but I already know that it is mostly correct just from your description.

  • #2416

    Chris
    Keymaster

    I think you’ll enjoy reading it Larry. It’s got everything a good conspiracy theory requires. Just enough kernels of truth to make you stop and think. I don’t personally find it compelling but it has some good history and illustrations to make it good reading.

  • #2419

    Larry
    Participant

    Just read it. Believe every word. Love the “elastic money” reference and see it as key to the whole thing. Would it really work? Could we really have “elastic money” to provide unlimited financing for anything? Do you suppose?

    Clearly, this is exactly why and how everything has happened since the meeting on Jekyl Island. I believe!

  • #2423

    Chris
    Keymaster

    “Elastic money”.  I don’t have a lot of faith in the concept for one particular reason. It implies that the core value of money has no basis in tangible assets. Since money is the vehicle of barter for commodities or physical assets it has to be treated as a commodity or asset. All assets and or commodities are finite therefore the money available to barter for those assets has to be finite and ideally equal to the sum total of all commodities and assets. That’s not to say that the money supply should not expand. As assets are created thru labor or “wealth is created” monetary supply should increase to facilitate the barter of those new assets thus keeping a balance and stable prices. Without such expansion the money supply would dry up and cause price deflation.  What the federal reserve does is exactly the opposite. In times of slow asset growth and commodity production they increase the supply of money thinking that it will force the growth of assets and commodities. When that doesn’t occur it causes price inflation because the money supply becomes too large to be supported by the underlying assets. When that happens they feel obligated to retract the money supply in the name of  “price stability” using interest as the vehicle. Three cheers for them as they reign in the money supply and curb the inflation that they created with “value added” dollars effectively getting their piece of whatever productivity did occur during the slow time.

    We are beyond the days of commodity backed money. I don’t think we could ever go back BUT our current system of fiat currency is so wrought with thieves on the grandest scale imaginable that the only solution is to turn back Jekyl Island around the globe. Currency regulation must be returned to the people that are held responsible for backing their currency. Although it’s probably already too late.

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